Heritage Hospice to participate in Good Giving Challenge

This year's Good Giving Challenge begins at 9 a.m. Nov. 29 and ends Dec. 31.

This year’s Good Giving Challenge begins at 9 a.m. Nov. 29 and ends Dec. 31.

Heritage Hospice once again will participate in the Good Giving Challenge. This year’s event begins at 9 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 29. It ends right before midnight Dec. 31.

Heritage Hospice likes to participate because of the opportunity for match money from the Hudson-Ellis Foundation. This year, the Hudson-Ellis Foundation is providing $25,000 to provide a match of 50 cents for every $1 donated. About 11 Boyle agencies are participating. No one agency can receive more than $5,000 of the money and to be eligible for the match money, an agency must raise $1,000. Donations can range from $10 and up.

With the help of our great supporters, we hope to be successful in receiving the match money. All donations must be made online through Razoo. So, please Save the Date and the start time of 9 a.m. Nov. 29. We know $25,000 is a generous portion, but also know from past experience that that money will be gone in an hour, so please be ready to make a donation.

More details will follow about this wonderful event, overseen by the Blue Grass Community Foundation. Thanks so much.

Martin receives state excellence award

Sharon Martin, left, Heritage Hospice Community and Provider Liaison, received the Award of Excellence from the Kentucky Association of Hospice and Palliative Care from Janelle Wheeler, Heritage Hospice Executive Director. Sharon received the honor for her work with the Veterans Appreciation Day.

Sharon Martin, left, Heritage Hospice Community and Provider Liaison, received the Award of Excellence from the Kentucky Association of Hospice and Palliative Care from Janelle Wheeler, Heritage Hospice Executive Director. Sharon received the honor for her work with the Veterans Appreciation Day.

Sharon Martin, Heritage Hospice Community and Provider Liaison, received the Award of Excellence from the Kentucky Association of Hospice and Palliative Care.

Heritage Hospice Executive Director Janelle Wheeler surprised Martin, a 10-year employee, with the honor at the August conference of the state association.

In addition to her many outreach activities, she started an annual Veterans Appreciation Day nine years ago. This event welcomed 900 veterans and 300 of their guests in 2015 for a lunch and many door prizes.

Wheeler nominated Martin for the state award in recognition of her hard work on this event and her many other activities.

“She is an indy who many times over I have said, ‘I wish that we could do it or I would like to do or I wonder if we could do and that’s all I would have to say. She would take the idea whatever it would be and run with it and not just do it but do it in a way that would amaze me beyond words.”

Dr. Chatham earns certification as hospice medical director

Dr. Chatham named medical doctor

Dr. Rebecca Chatham has earned certification as a hospice medical director.

Heritage Hospice Medical Director Dr. Rebecca Chatham has earned certification as a hospice medical director.
Chatham became Medical Director in February after serving two years as part-time Associate Medical Director.
Before joining Heritage Hospice, she was in practice at Family Medicine Clinic of Danville since 2007.
Chatham graduated magna cum laude from the University of Notre Dame in 2000 with a bachelor’s degree in graphic design and pre-professional studies. She then returned home to attend Louisiana State University School of Medicine in New Orleans, graduating in 2004. In 2007 she completed her residency in Family Medicine at the University of Louisville/Glasgow-Barren County Family Medicine Residency Program. In addition to her latest certification, Dr. Chatham is board certified through the American Board of Family Medicine. Dr. Chatham is married to Dennis, and they have four children. They live in Boyle County.

Corning grant supports Transitions

Rochelle Sizemore, Heritage Hospice’s Clinical Counseling Services Coordinator, left, accepts a $10,000 check from the Corning Incorporated Foundation from Randy Miller of the Harrodsburg Corning facility. At right are Emily Toadvine, Heritage Hospice’s Development and Community Liaison, and Matt Baker, Director of Business Operations. The Transitions program provides volunteer and case management services to individuals with a terminal illness who have a prognosis of one year or less to live. The program also supports clients’ families.

Rochelle Sizemore, Heritage Hospice’s Clinical Counseling Services Coordinator, left, accepts a $10,000 check from the Corning Incorporated Foundation from Randy Miller of the Harrodsburg Corning facility. At right are Emily Toadvine, Heritage Hospice’s Development and Community Liaison, and Matt Baker, Director of Business Operations. The Transitions program provides volunteer and case management services to individuals with a terminal illness who have a prognosis of one year or less to live. The program also supports clients’ families.

Heritage Hospice’s Transitions program has received a $10,000 grant from the Corning Incorporated Foundation.

The Transitions program, which began in 2001, provides clients whose life expectancy is a year or less and their families and caregivers with the services of a social worker and volunteer.

“We are very appreciative of this generous donation to our Transitions program,” says Rochelle Sizemore, Heritage Hospice’s Clinical Counseling Services Coordinator and coordinator of the Transitions program. “This donation will assist us with being able to provide a much needed service to our community.”

Janelle Wheeler, Heritage Hospice’s Executive Director, says the Corning Incorporated Foundation’s generous gift will have a great impact on the clients served by Transitions.

“They are a great community partner committed to helping others and making a difference. We appreciate them very much.”

Unlike hospice patients, Transitions clients can be receiving curative treatment, such as chemotherapy or radiation, or palliative treatment. The program’s social worker focuses on helping clients and their caregivers cope with the stress of the client’s illness, such as poor health, loss of mobility and financial pressures. In one year’s time, this program made 1,989 community contacts for its 155 patients. The contacts were made to physicians and their staff, for benefit coordination, and for assistance with finances, housing and legal issues.

 

The volunteers’ role is to come to the client’s home and offer the caregivers a chance to leave the home and take a break from the stresses of caregiving. While in the home, volunteers offer companionship to the client. If the caregiver does not want to leave the home, a volunteer may support the caregiver by running errands. The Transitions program also offers bereavement counseling for families for 13 months after the death of a client.

 

The program is shifting to provide more focus on post-acute patients in an effort to minimize hospital readmissions and reduce costs that ultimately affect everyone. The goal is to see patients soon after discharge from the hospital to offer access to support networks and provide links to community resources such as home health, hospice and programs for senior citizens. Accessing these types of services may help reduce clients’ need to return to the hospital soon after being discharged. By providing regular contact and support, the clients’ problems can be addressed more immediately for the best outcome for the client.

Anyone with questions about Transitions, may call Rochelle Sizemore at 859-236-2425.

Volunteer helps in many ways

Jane Brantley

Jane Brantley has been a volunteer since 1997.

Jane Brantley is an outstanding Heritage Hospice volunteer. To read about how she helps, please click on the link below.

http://heritagehospice.com/volunteers/

Our next volunteer training will be Sept. 10 at Heritage Hospice. If you or someone you know might want to volunteer, please call Wendy Hellard, director of volunteer services, or Maureen Draut, volunteer services coordinator, at 859-236-2425 or email whellard@heritagehospice.com or mdraut@heritagehospice.com to discuss that interest. Please register by Sept. 7.

Knights of Columbus support Heritage Hospice in Good Giving

Tom Handloser with the Knights of Columbus' Danville Chapter presents a $500 check to Heritage Hospice's Executive Director Janelle Wheeler as a match donation for the nonprofit's participation in the 2016 Good Giving Guide Challenge.

Tom Handloser with the Knights of Columbus’ Danville Chapter presents a $500 check to Heritage Hospice’s Executive Director Janelle Wheeler as a match donation for the nonprofit’s participation in the 2016 Good Giving Guide Challenge.

Tom Handloser with Knights of Columbus’ Danville chapter presented a $500 check to Heritage Hospice’s Executive Director Janelle Wheeler as a match donation for the nonprofit’s participation in the 2016 Good Giving Challenge.

The Challenge, overseen by the Blue Grass Community Foundation, begins Nov. 29 and ends at midnight Dec. 31. Contributions can be made online during this time and Blue Grass Community Foundation’s website will be live at 9 a.m. Nov. 29 with links to the area for donations to Heritage Hospice and other participants.

As an agency serving Boyle County, Heritage Hospice is eligible for match money of 50 cents for every $1 donated. The Hudson-Ellis Foundation makes the match money possible. Hudson-Ellis is offering $25,000 in match money to Boyle agencies participating in the Good Giving Challenge. There is a cap this year of $5,000 in match money per participating agency. Heritage Hospice also provides end-of-life care to patients and support to their families in Garrard, Lincoln and Mercer counties.

September golf tournament raises money for charities

The Knights of Columbus Father Thomas J. Malloy Council No. 6317 holds many events to support its charitable contributions. Its major fundraiser is its annual golf tournament, which will be held Sept. 10 at Old Bridge Golf Course in Danville. Anyone interested in participating or supporting this event, should call Old Bridge at 859-236-1234.

In addition to Heritage Hospice, the Knights of Columbus support seminarian training, right to life, church activities, school activities, Boy Scouts, Kentucky Association for the Mentally Disabled, prison ministry, youth groups at three parishes, St. Baldrick Foundation, Haven Care Center and Little Sisters of the Poor.

Thanks to retiring board members

Ken Thomas

Ken Thomas

Dick Webb

Dick Webb

Thank you to three retiring Heritage Hospice board members.

They are: Ken Thomas of Whitaker Bank, who served as chairman.

Dick Webb of the Mercer County Industrial Board, who served as vice chairman; and Calvin Denham of First Southern National Bank in Stanford.

Heritage Hospice appreciates your support and service over the years.

Denham Calvin

Calvin Denham

Moran receives 2016 Spirit of Hospice Award

Dr. Daniel J. Moran, center, received the Heritage Hospice Margaret Caldwell Spirit of Hospice Award Wednesday during his last day in the office. Moran, who served as Heritage Hospice’s medical director for about 10 years in the 1980s and 1990s, is retiring after practicing medicine for 37 years. Members of his family and Heritage Hospice staff came to his Kentucky One Primary Care office to give him the honor. From left, are: hospice’s Community and Provider Liaison Sharon Martin, Provider Liaison Miranda Perkins, Executive Director Janelle Wheeler, Moran, his wife, Dr. Katie Bright, and his sister-in-law Sallie Bright, Nursing Services Manager Pam Whitehouse, and Brenda Jones of the business department.

Dr. Daniel J. Moran, center, received the Heritage Hospice Margaret Caldwell Spirit of Hospice Award Wednesday during his last day in the office. Moran, who served as Heritage Hospice’s medical director for about 10 years in the 1980s and 1990s, is retiring after practicing medicine for 37 years. Members of his family and Heritage Hospice staff came to his Kentucky One Primary Care office to give him the honor. From left, are: hospice’s Community and Provider Liaison Sharon Martin, Provider Liaison Miranda Perkins, Executive Director Janelle Wheeler, Moran, his wife, Dr. Katie Bright, and his sister-in-law Sallie Bright, Nursing Services Manager Pam Whitehouse, and Brenda Jones of the business department.

The 2016 Heritage Hospice’s Margaret Caldwell Spirit of Hospice Award winner embodies many of the qualities that the end of life service strives to offer.

Caring.

Check.

Compassionate.

Check.

Makes House Calls.

Check.

This year’s honor is awarded to Dr. Daniel J. Moran, who is retiring after practicing 37 years. He spent 10 years in the 1980s and 1990s as Heritage Hospice’s medical director. As testament to his popularity among patients, a line of people waiting to say goodbye snaked out in the parking lot at his recent retirement open house at Kentucky One Primary Care in Danville. His guests waited patiently as he exchanged pleasantries and hugs with many people whose lives he touched during his career.

Moran’s ability to care deeply about each one of his patients is his signature, says Dr. David Overstreet, who has practiced 24 years with Moran.

“He knew not just their medical situations, but he knew their social circumstances. He went to their funerals, their weddings and he participated in their lives,” says Overstreet, noting that Moran was his own mother’s doctor.

Dr. Overstreet says his colleague went the extra mile for his patients.

“He still made house calls to people who were too feeble and frail to come see him. He devoted an enormous amount of time to his patients because they needed him. That’s a rare thing in medicine today.”

These patient-doctor friendships were forged based on one important rule of thumb Moran has followed.

“One of my professors in medical school said if you listen to a patient long enough they will tell you what is wrong,” Moran confided in an interview at his family’s Boyle farm a few days after the retirement party.

He is seated on a comfortable couch, relaxing after a rigorous round of physical therapy.

His spinal pain stems from farm work and being a doctor.

“I’ve lifted too many patients, too many bales of hay. I’ve got a bad back,” he says.

Moran recalled his start with Heritage Hospice in the 1980s. The nonprofit holds a special place in Moran’s heart because mother-in-law, Pat Bright, was instrumental in getting the organization up and running in 1979. She was good friends with the woman for whom the Spirit of Hospice Award is named.

Anne Byrom, one of the first nurses to work at Heritage Hospice, approached Moran about becoming medical director. They were both at Ephraim McDowell Regional Medical Center in Danville, where Moran already was up to his elbows with his workload. He tried to turn down Byrom’s request but she wouldn’t take no for an answer.

“I said, ‘I’m too busy.’ I was working 60 to 70 hours. She said, ‘It’s busy people who get things done.’”

One of the takeaways of being a hospice medical director is that Moran does not hesitate to have conversations with patients about end-of-life care provided by hospice.

“If patients are getting to the end of life and if we can offer them the best quality of life for that last chapter of their life, it’s a wonderful gift to be able to offer.”

He believes in recommending hospice care.

“Many of my patients is terminal: COPD, end-stage cancer, end-stage heart disease. If we are going to take care of these people cradle to grave, someone’s got to be there and that’s where hospice comes in.”

Moran makes another important observation about hospice services.

“When the family gets overtaxed, I think hospice is more important in helping the caregiver.”

Janelle Wheeler, Heritage Hospice’s executive director, presented Dr. Moran with the

Margaret Caldwell Spirit of Hospice Award on Wednesday, June 22, his last day of work. “He has been an integral part of our organization over the years and is valued for his contribution in the hospice industry. We will miss his gentle nature and kind voice but wish him nothing but the best as he transitions to this new chapter in his life.”

Andy Baker, Heritage Hospice executive director when Moran was medical director, says Moran gave his all to the nonprofit’s work.

“Dr. Moran gave us incredible support and encouragement with his phone calls, personal visits and time that he spent at our team meetings. His genuine interest in people and his compassion for the things patients and families were dealing with at the time that hospice served them was very apparent to see. He has been a true friend to hospice.”

Noreta Royalty, a nurse at Heritage Hospice for 14 years, says Moran’s personality traits perfectly suited those needed at hospice.

“I was privileged to be working at Heritage Hospice when Dr. Dan Moran was medical director in the late ‘80s and ‘90s. I was very impressed that he wholeheartedly embraced the hospice philosophy for patient care. As a leader of our team, he was very knowledgeable, kind, compassionate, considerate and concerned for patients, families and hospice staff. He was very professional and always a perfect gentleman with a contagious smile.”

Moran’s wife of 40 years, pediatrician Katie Bright, appreciates her husband’s ability to connect with people.

“He is very curious, very outgoing. He has a real gift for making connections with people. He seems able to connect in some way with almost anyone, communicating that a little part of that person’s problem has also affected his life in some way (perhaps thorough things that happened with his mother, his siblings, a friend, his wife, our kids, etc.). He also has a lot of gentle mischief in him, which allows him to tease people in a way that deepens the connection. Patients can see that he cares about them as individuals, which leads to the respect, that goes both ways, between him and his patients.”

Annual motorcycle ride is Aug. 20

Heritage Hospice’s 17th annual H.O.P.E. motorcycle ride will be Aug. 20. Registration is 9 to 11 a.m. at Heritage Hospice. Kickstands up at 11 a.m.

Cost is $15 for riders and an additional poker hand is $5. The first 30 people receive T-shirts with a design by Studio Ink owner Chad Sinkhorn. Special thanks to the Raptors Motorcycle Club, which is keeping us safe by providing the road guards.

The rain date is Aug. 27.

What is H.O.P.E.? It is Helping Others Perceptions of End of Life Care. The ride benefits Heritage Hospice, which serves Boyle, Garrard, Lincoln and Mercer counties. We will ride through those counties.

Download a flyer below and spread the word.

2016 motorcycle ride

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